Tag Archives: thrillers

TSS: Currently reading Brown, Cabot, Fowler and Neville

It’s Sunday again – time most definitely has been flying by. I’m currently reading four books, but this week is a hectic week for me in terms of editorial deadlines, so I’m not sure how many of these I will be able to finish up and review by this time next Sunday.

But there’s just something so comforting about having such a lovely line-up of books in my Currently Reading pile.

I’ve been getting into the Christmas spirit with Rita Mae Brown’s Santa Claws. Mrs. Murphy and the gang are back at it again, and even though a murder isn’t the most Christmas-y of things, Santa Claws is shaping up to be a nice, cozy read. It’s definitely the kind of book you want to read with a mug of hot chocolate and mini marshmallows by your side. (Oh, wait a minute … I get that feeling with every book, actually.)

I haven’t gotten any further along on Katherine Neville’s The Fire, not because it’s not looking like it will be a good read, but because it’s one of those big, complex looking books that say to me, “I dare you to pick me up, start reading me and then put me down half an hour later because you’ve got work to do. Go on. I dare you.” Frankly, I’m a real wuss when it comes to such challenges; The Fire looks like it will be hard to put down once I get into it, and with so many deadlines coming at me, I’m scared to pick it up.

I know, kind of pathetic. What can I say? Books rule my life. And I’m woman enough to admit it.

Moving right along, I’ve also started Meg Cabot’s Big Boned. I love Cabot’s work, whether it’s her children’s books, YA novels or books for adults. In Big Boned, Heather Wells is back to solve another murder. I personally am reading this not for the whodunnit, but to see if Heather (a) will ever go back to singing superstardom again and (b) ends up with Cooper. Tad’s okay, but Cooper’s more than okay. Poor Tad.

Finally, I’m also reading Christopher Fowler’s White Corridor, another in the Peculiar Crimes Unit series featuring Bryant and May. I really like this duo, who are as quirky as you can get; sure they’re older, but that doesn’t get in the way of solving the crime, another locked room murder.

So that’s my reading week for the coming week. Now if I can only get some of these pesky deadlines finished up, it will be a very good reading week.

And here’s a round-up of the reviews I posted this past week:

Not in the Flesh, by Ruth Rendell (review)

The Cruellest Month, by Louise Penny (review)

The Book of Lies, by Brad Meltzer (review)

Casting Spells, by Barbara Bretton (review)

Review: The Book of Lies, by Brad Meltzer

The Book of LiesFrom the jacket flap:

In chapter four of the Bible, Cain kills Abel. It is the world’s most famous murder. But the Bible is silent about one key detail: the weapon Cain used to kill his brother. That weapon is still lost to history.

In 1932 Mitchell Siegel was killed by two gunshots to the chest. While mourning, his son dreamed of a bulletproof man and created the world’s greatest hero: Superman. And like Cain’s murder weapon, the gun used in this unsolved murder has never been found.

Today in Ford Lauderdale, Florida, Cal Harper comes face-to-face with his own family tragedy: His long-missing father has been shot with a gun that traces back to Mitchell Siegel’s 1932 murder. But soon after their surprising reunion, Cal and his father are attacked by a ruthless killer tattooed with the ancient marketings of Cain.

So begins the chase for the world’s first murder weapon. It is a race that will pull Cal back into his own past even as it propels him forwrd through the true story of Cain and Abel, an eighty-year-old unsolvable puzzle, and the deadly organization known for the past century as the Leadership.

What does Cain, history’s greatest villain, have to do with Superman, the world’s greatest hero? And what to two murders, committed thousands of years apart, have in common?

The Snapshot Review

What I Liked: The action is fast paced, and the pace never lets up; the characters are a little bit different from your run-of-the-mill best selling thriller novel; the plot is interesting and consistent. A real page turner.

And the Bonus! No gratuitous, graphic violence. There is violence, yes, but it’s definitely not gratuitous. Or particularly graphic.

Ms. Bookish’s Very Quick Take: Try to have a nice bit of time to sit down with this one, because it’s not an easy book to put down once you’ve started it.

Continue reading

Mailbox Monday: Another Eclectic Mix

It’s Mailbox Monday again, and here’s what arrived in Ms. Bookish’s household this past week:

Mystery/Thriller: The Book of Lies, by Brad Meltzer.

Chick Lit/Mystery: Big Boned, by Meg Cabot

General fiction/Holidays: The Christmas Train, by David Baldacci

Young adult/Fantasy: The Dragonfly Pool, by Eva Ibbotson

Thriller/Suspense: The Fire, by Katherine Neville

Romance: Sundays at Tiffany’s, by James Patterson and Gabrielle Charbonnet

Graphic novel/Children’s book/Mystery: Max Finder Mystery Collected Casebook Volume 2, by Liam O’Donnell and Michael Cho

Paranormal/Urban fantasy: Personal Demon, by Kelley ArmstrongYoung adult: Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist, by Rachel Cohn and David Levithan

Children’s book: Alvin Ho: Allergic to Girls, School, and Other Scary Things, by Lenore Look

Mystery: Santa Clawed, by Rita Mae Brown & Sneaky Pie Brown

Chick lit/Romance: Daring Chloe, by Laura Jensen Walker

Mystery: Not in the Flesh, by Ruth Rendell

Children’s book/Fantasy: The Invention of Hugo Cabret, by Brian Selznick

I suspect I’m going to have to start reading just a little bit faster to get through my TBR pile. Reviews on each of these will be upcoming as I get through them.

The Sunday Salon – Currently Reading: Book of Lies, Casting Spells and The Fire

I am currently reading a fun stash of books right now, and the only reason why I haven’t finished any of them is because I haven’t had a good block of time to do so. I keep my “currently reading” books in different rooms of the house, and tend to just pick up whatever book is in the room I happen to be in. Of course, if I sit down with a nice chunk of time, I’m likely to finish whatever book it is, but this week has been hectic, unfortunately.

But I should be finishing up all three of the following books this week:

  1. The Book of Lies, by Brad Meltzer. This one is stashed away in the living room, and it’s a pity each time I’ve picked it up I’ve had limited time, because this one has been a real page turner so far. I’m only in into the fourth chapter (or so) and each time I’ve had to put it down, it’s been extremely difficult doing so.
  2. Casting Spells, by Barbara Bretton. So far this one is shaping up to be pretty good (although there’s a minor discrepancy near the start of the book that keeps bothering me – I’m hoping it will be explained away as I get further into the book). The book involves a quaint New England town which is home to many different magical people (werewolves, witches, vampires and fairies included), a murder, a sorceress’ daughter and a human cop. It’s been a nice read so far.
  3. The Fire, by Katherine Neville. This is the sequel to Neville’s novel The Eight, which I thoroughly enjoyed reading several years ago. I’ve hardly had a chance to do much more than look at the cover of this one longingly and open it up to read the first few words, but I’m definitely looking forward to this one. If it’s anywhere near as good as The Eight, it’s going to be a wonderful read.

Sadly, I do have one current read that I just don’t see myself getting back to this week, not with this handful of exciting books calling to me. I am halfway through Princess Izzy and the E-Street Shuffle by Beverly Bartlett, but it’s “court biography” style, while interesting, hasn’t been interesting enough to get me to pick it up after having put it down. I do want to finish it, though, since I’d like to see what happens with Princess Izzy and the Springsteen loving mechanic in the States (and also, I’m reading this for the From the Stacks reading challenge); I’m just not sure exactly when I’ll be able to get back to it.

Mailbox Monday: An eclectic mix

It was a busy week this past week for incoming books, with, it seems like, a little bit of everything. I’ve already mentioned some of the books that arrived this past week, in last week’s Friday Finds post, so I won’t mention them again here (including some romance/chick lit – I just noticed there’s none in the list below).

Essays: Fear Itself: The Horror Fiction of Stephen King, edited by Tim Underwood and Chuck Miller

Children’s Mystery: Doppelganger, by Pete Hautman and Mary Logue (review is here)

Paranormal Mystery: An Ice Cold Grave, by Charlaine Harris (just finished it, review coming soon)

Thriller/Mystery: Raven Black, by Ann Cleeves

Children’s Fantasy: The Mysterious Benedict Society and the Perilous Journey, by Trenton Lee Stewart

Paranormal mystery: Casting Spells, by Barbara Bretton

Mystery: Lovelace and Button (International Investigators Inc.), by James Hawkins

Mystery: The Suspect, by L.R. Wright

Children’s Fantasy: Savvy, by Ingrid Law

Children’s Novel: Clementine’s Letter, by Sara Pennypacker

Essays: 13 Ways of Looking at the Novel, by Jane Smiley (I had already read a copy of this from the library, and loved her list of 100 classics so much that I decided I needed my own copy)

Memoirs: Born Standing Up, by Steve Martin

Lots of great reading coming up!