(Trying To) Conquer the Busy

I’m a bit of a planner nut—but I’m a planner nut who’s currently without a planner right now. And boy, do I ever need one!

I had one that was sort of working for me, a mashup of the Passion Planner (I used the free downloads) and some other bits and pieces of printables I found in various places online.

But then the summer happened. As many of you know, it’s been quite the summer for me. Big changes, endings, and new beginnings.

It’s been a lot to take in. And I’ve been doing it without the aid of a planner.

(Thank you, Google Calendar, for at least keeping me steady on my feet when it comes to deadlines!)

I’m moving at the end of the month, I’m trying to make full use of my coworking space, my son turns 12 this year so the homeschooling has to be turned up a notch, there’s work of course (plus I’ve expanded from indexing into editing), I’m starting to cook again, and then there are also all the things that have to be taken care of when a marriage breaks down, even if you are going to try and live under the same roof so you can co-parent.

It all adds up to a lot of busy. An awful lot of busy.

Despite all the busyness, I’ve come to this realization: I really have to sit down and set aside some time to put together a system that will work for all the things I have on the go right now. Because honestly, I have days where I feel like I’m drowning in “stuff I have to do/what have I forgotten to do/OMG how could I have forgotten THAT?”

It’s been all shapes of crazy, that’s for sure. So much so, last week when I was at the dollar store picking up index cards (hello, NaNoWriMo, here I come!) I also picked up a chunky little to-do list book.

Because it was braindump to-do list time. I tend to do these only when I get overly overwhelmed (which is a bit more intensity than just plain overwhelmed). And it was so nice getting all that stuff out of my head onto paper. I even felt lighter.

Now at least I’m not as worried about forgetting things. But I do need to transfer things over from the braindump to-do list onto regular planning/agenda pages.

Any suggestions out there? What are you using and loving? I need something that will accommodate my daily to-dos as well as keep me on track and motivated to work on all the projects I have. If it gives me space to track how I’m spending my time, even better. And a week at a glance for the Sundays would be awesome.

A Room of One’s Own

Most of you have probably heard of Virginia Woolf’s famous quote about women writers:

a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction

And for the longest time, I thought well, maybe, and maybe not. Because there I was, I had both, and no, it wasn’t working out for me quite the way I wanted.

But did I really have both these things?

I have come to the realization that I didn’t.

I thought I had money, because I worked and I made money, but the reality was, I never had money of my own. It all went into a shared pool and paid the bills and yes, if I ever wanted something, I could go out and buy it using the money in this shared pool—but I always felt I had to justify it somehow, not to anyone else, just to myself. So even though I made this money, it has never felt like “mine”.

I’m sure this happens with a lot of people, and when you’re in the marriage the shared pool reflects your shared life. But when you’re out of the marriage, and there’s no shared pool any more, it begins feeling different, this awareness that your finances are no longer “ours” but “yours”.

And I thought I had a room of my own, because I’ve been self-employed since forever, it seems, and of course in order to do this self-employment, freelance thing successfully, you have to have a place to work. So everywhere I’ve lived, I’ve always had an “office”. A desk. My own desk, where I sit for many, many hours of the day, working.

But lately, because of the change in my relationship status, I’ve been looking at places where I can go to work outside of my home. Since my ex- and I are going to be living separate and apart, but under the same roof, I’ve been feeling I need more than just my own mini-apartment—I  need to take myself out there to do my work. Step away from the familiar, because things are changing. Because otherwise this big important change I’m living through will feel too much like a change in name only, when the actual “this is what’s happening today” won’t really change.

I want—no, I need—to have that feeling of my own space as much as possible while still accommodating this plan of ours to continue to coparent our son under the same roof.

So on Friday, I had a trial day at a coworking place, and I was absolutely stunned. I’d decided to test the place out by working on an upcoming deadline and seeing how it felt to be working someplace other than at my own desk at home. I figured I’d be finished at around 8 in the evening. But I ended up finishing at 5, three hours earlier than I’d expected.

Working away from my regular desk space, I was far more productive and focused.

And something else unexpected: even though it was only a trial space, the whole time I was sitting there, I felt like it was mine. My own little bit of space, where I could—and did—sit for hours, undisturbed.

Which is when I realized, I’ve never really had “a room of one’s own.” Because everywhere I’ve worked, since I was at home, I was always still a part of the whole scene, if you know what I mean. I was always there, ready and available and accessible for whatever interruptions came my way.

And trust me, there are always at least a few interruptions, especially since there’s always someone at home.

“My space” was, in reality, as much everyone’s space as it was mine. (Most mothers who work from home will know what I mean.)

So back to Woolf’s quote. I don’t know if this will help me write more fiction (or, more importantly, finish all the novels I’ve started), but I do feel like I now have the chance to find out. Because I will have money and a room of my own.

Now, I know when Woolf said “a woman must have money” she meant financial independence. And no, I will not be financially independent, not in that standard way. But still, I will have money to call my own. I can say, I’m going to go buy “X” with the money I earned doing “Y”, which is something I’ve never felt able to say before.

I don’t know why, but it makes a difference.

And I’ve decided to take the coworking space. I will work there, yes. But I will also write there. It really will be space of my own.

And because I’ll only be using it three days of the week plus every other Sunday (the other three days and the other Sundays are my days with Dylan) and because I will be paying cold hard cash for the space, my rather thrifty soul is already thinking along the lines of, “I must utilize every moment of it that I can”.

Which surely must bode well for my writing.

So I’ll work there. And I’ll write there every day I’m there. And when I have those occasional days without deadlines? I’ll write even more.

A room of one’s own. I like that idea.

Endings, and A New Beginning

It’s been an event-filled summer here, one filled with big changes and big feelings, and things have finally settled enough emotionally for me to feel at ease with writing about it.

A couple of months ago, my husband and I decided to split up. It’s a decision that’s been a long time coming, and perhaps because of the length of time it took for us to come to this resolution, there was a feeling of inevitability to it for both of us. And, perhaps because we have each grieved in our own ways through the past four or five years as we continually tried to repair our failing relationship, we find ourselves able to proceed amicably.

We’re also moving into our separate new beginnings in a different way than most divorcing couples. We have always homeschooled our 12-year-old son, Dylan, together, and neither of us want our divorce to affect this. We want to co-parent, and we also want to ease this traumatic time in his life as best as we can.

While we aren’t any good at being a couple, at being life partners, our relationship status doesn’t change the fact that we’ll both continue to be Dylan’s parents. So we’re choosing to explore an alternative post-separation living arrangement, one that’s very uncertain, one we know will be filled with all manner of challenges. Still, it feels like an alternative we need to try, one we want to try.

So, in addition to ending our marriage, we’ve decided to try living separately and apart, but under the same roof. Thanks to the generosity of a dear friend of mine, next month we will be moving into a much larger place, a space that has room enough for each of us to have our own “mini-apartments” at opposite ends.

Our new separate mini-apartments are small, but there is room enough for us to have our own bedrooms, our own living areas, our own bathrooms. We will share a kitchen. Dylan will be able to go back and forth between our separate places as he pleases, and while we will each have individual responsibility for him on alternating days, we will both be able to homeschool him on a daily basis. And we will try doing a family activity, the three of us, on Sundays.

While such an arrangement is unusual, it’s one people have tried and are trying, although not always with success. There’s even a name for it: a modified bird’s nest arrangement. After we began exploring this idea, I found a book (I always do, don’t I?) called Reconciliable Differences: Marriages End, Families Don’t, in which author Cate Cochran writes about ten divorced relationships, including her own, in which the former partners embarked on a similar post-separation living arrangement. It was an eye-opening read for both of us, showing us what’s possible, and spelling out clearly and succinctly the many challenges we will be facing.

We both recognize that this arrangement may not work out in the long-term—there are just too many variables, too many potential obstacles that might arise. But we’re both committed to giving it a try.

So. Endings, but definitely a new beginning, too.

A few weeks ago I came across this post from Brainpickings on David Whyte reading from his poem “The Journey”; Whyte had written the poem for a friend who was in the process of ending a relationship. The final lines of the poem really resonated with me:

You are not leaving.
Even as the light fades quickly now,
you are arriving.

I am arriving. That is the hope and the potential that fills me right now, alongside the grief and sadness I feel at the ending of this long-term relationship.

My RIP X Reading List


Better late than never! So this weekend I decided to sign up for RIP X after quite a few years of thinking, “oh, that sounds like such fun.”  Yes, even though in the past I’ve always sucked at reading challenges – in fact, signing up for a reading challenge pretty much guaranteed I wouldn’t touch a single book that met that particular challenge criteria.

But I’m in the midst of embarking on a new life right now, and I’m determined to stop doing what I’ve always done in order to effect some hopefully awesome changes. Who says enjoying a reading challenge or two can’t be part of my new future, right?

And to make it pretty easy on myself, I’m signing up for the following levels:


Peril the Second: reading two books of any length which fit within the RIP categories (mystery, suspense, thriller, dark fantasy, gothic, horror and supernatural).


Peril of the Short Story: I’ll be (hopefully) reading RIP-related short stories during the challenge period as well.

And now the real fun begins:


Even though I’m only aiming for Peril the Second, I am such a moody reader I always work better if I’m working off a long list of potential reads than otherwise. And then it occurred to me I should also try to use this opportunity to get through some of the books in my TBR, instead of new and exciting titles yet to come my way. So here are the books I might be reading for RIP X, all of which come from my TBR piles:

Pieces and Players by Blue Balliett (middle grade mystery)

Deceptions by Kelley Armstrong (dark fantasy)

The Hanged Man by P.N. Elrod (mystery, dark fantasy)

The Sound of Broken Glass by Deborah Crombie (mystery)

The Shadow Cabinet by Maureen Johnson (supernatural, dark fantasy)

Bag of Bones by Stephen King (horror)

Dreams of Gods and Monsters by Laini Taylor (dark fantasy)

Black House by Stephen King and Peter Straub (horror)

Anna Dressed In Blood by Kendare Blake (horror)

The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson (horror)

We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson (horror)

Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes (mystery, horror)

Carrion Comfort by Dan Simmons (horror)

Short story collections:

Dark Screams, volume 1, edited by Brian James Freeman and Richard Chizmar

The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror (I have several of these volumes)

The Best Horror of the Year (I have several of these volumes as well)

Year’s Best Weird Fiction, edited by Laird Barron

The Black Lizard Big Book of Locked-Room Mysteries edited by Otto Penzler

The Weird, edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer

Actually, I have a lot more horror short story collections scattered around the place. Once I start packing my books, I’m sure more of them will surface …

So this is my RIP X reading list! Surely with such a large selection of books, I’ll be able to finish two between now and the end of October, right?

Review: Book Scavenger by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman


I haven’t had much of an appetite for reading lately—I’ve got such big changes going on in my life and while decisions have been made, things are still in a transition phase (I’ll write more about that in a later post, once things have settled down) and some days it feels a little like limbo. And when that happens, I feel restless, and when I’m restless I can’t focus. Which means reading hasn’t been tempting me.

But then one day I was pacing aimlessly around the place, and my eyes lit on Book Scavenger, which I had out from the library.

I’d seen it earlier this year on NetGalley, but it was only available for UK reviewers. I’d liked the book’s description so much, I checked my library, found they had it on pre-order and put a hold on it. Then I forgot about it until it came in for me a few weeks ago.

I picked it up and reread the blurb. The plot, which is a mystery, centres around a book-hiding game called Book Scavenger. And it sounds like a really awesome game: you hide books and find others’ hidden books using codes and ciphers—kind of like Book Crossing taken to a whole new—gaming—level.

Reading the blurb, I remembered why I’d put a hold on Book Scavenger in the first place.

A mystery about books. And puzzles. Who can resist this?

I certainly couldn’t. Even in my restless state, I sat down and began reading. And I was hooked right from the start, which begins with the rules of the Book Scavenger game.

Oh, how I wish such a game really did exist! It would be so much fun!

I also loved Emily, who’s so unused to having friends because her parents are on a quest to have 50 homes in 50 states (a theme which they’ve turned into a successful blog of the same name). And James, the puzzle whiz who has affectionately named his cowlick Steve. The mystery is intriguing, the way the two kids are involved is very credible, the stakes are high and the puzzles are sheer fun.

Book Scavenger is like a delightful combination of Ellen Raskin’s The Westing Game, a book I absolutely adore, and Blue Balliett’s wonderful, intelligent arts-related middle grade mysteries (The Wright 3, The Calder Game and Chasing Vermeer)—but with a personality all its own.

I enjoyed Book Scavenger so much, I’m now reading it again with my son.

Reading Short: A Short Books Reading List

It occurred to me the other day, when I received a DM on Twitter from a book blogger/writer friend, that it’s been “radio silence” from me online lately, both here on the blog and also on Facebook and Twitter.

So a quick update: I’m fine, but I’m also going through some big personal life changes, which I’ll probably blog about at a later date, when things have settled down into more of a rhythm.

With everything that’s been going on (including an upcoming, very very big move), I’ve been feeling a lack of focus, a restlessness that makes it hard for me to sit still and actually do anything. And believe me, that’s been having a huge impact on my reading.

The last time I talked about my reading, I was in the midst of three chunksters. Needless to say, I haven’t picked them up for a while!

So the other day, I found myself thinking about “reading short”: books that are 200 pages or less. With that in mind, I decided to put together a Short Books Reading List. Looking around online, I saw several such lists, but they were all heavily weighted toward literary fiction, which isn’t really my cup of tea (not unless there’s more than a dash of mystery, suspense, horror or fantasy in them).

Here’s what I’ve put together so far:

1. A Short Guide to a Happy Life by Anna Quindlen


I’m cheating a little with this first one, as it’s not fiction. But it is by a novelist, so that sort of counts, right? And since it weighs in at 64 pages, it definitely makes the page count criteria.

2. We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson


This book, which weighs in at a slim 160 pages, has been in my TBR pile since forever. I love Shirley Jackson’s short stories, so it’s about time I read this, I think.

3. Dept of Speculation by Jenny Offill


This one just squeezes onto the list at 192 pages, and while it’s not a genre book, I’ve been intrigued by its unique writing style ever since I first heard about it.

4. Heartburn by Nora Ephron


Confession: Nora Ephron is the reason I diligently massage face cream onto the back of my neck every night. :) I’ve had fun reading her novels in the past, and at 179 pages, Heartburn has a solid place in my Short Books Reading List.

5. Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer


So okay, at 208 pages this book shouldn’t have made the list. But I’ve been wanting to start The Southern Reach Trilogy for a while now, so this seemed like a good way to do it.

6. Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote


I’ve always wanted to read this book, and the 160 page count in this volume actually includes three other short stories, so it’s well within my page count criteria. Kind of makes up for Annihilation, right?

7. The King by Donald Barthelme


“King Arthur is rediscovered doing battle with the Nazis, and the grail to end all wars appears to be a bomb.” Need I say more? (157 pages)

8. The Madman of Bergerac by Georges Simenon


It’s been a really long time since I last read an Inspector Maigret novel. This one, book 15 in the series, weighs in at 144 pages, so it’s a perfect fit for my list.

So that’s what I’ve come up with so far. I don’t know if I’ll actually get to any of these books, but it feels good to know I have some short reads on hand for just in case. If you have any recommendations, please let me know in the comments – I’d love to expand this list!

Meg Cabot’s Royal Wedding


For Princess Mia, the past five years since college graduation have been a whirlwind of activity, what with living in New York City, running her new teen community center, being madly in love, and attending royal engagements. And speaking of engagements. Mia’s gorgeous longtime boyfriend Michael managed to clear both their schedules just long enough for an exotic (and very private) Caribbean island interlude where he popped the question! Of course Mia didn’t need to consult her diary to know that her answer was a royal oui.

But now Mia has a scandal of majestic proportions to contend with: Her grandmother’s leaked “fake” wedding plans to the press that could cause even normally calm Michael to become a runaway groom. Worse, a scheming politico is trying to force Mia’s father from the throne, all because of a royal secret that could leave Genovia without a monarch.  Can Mia prove to everyone—especially herself—that she’s not only ready to wed, but ready to rule as well?

Writing this post feels a little like writing about “some funny things happened on my way to the (book)store”. I’ve always enjoyed Meg Cabot’s books, so when TLC Book Tours asked if I’d like to be a part of the Royal Wedding blog tour, I jumped at the chance. I mean we’re talking Meg Cabot, we’re talking Mia all grown up, we’re talking about the transition of a much-loved YA character into the bright shining world of the New Adult.

How could I  say no?

You know how sometimes you’ve decided to do something, but challenges keep popping up, obstacles that turn what is normally an easy, well-known road—get a book, read it, write about it—into a path fraught with obstacles? That about covers my book encounter with Royal Wedding.

First, I had problems with the courier company getting the book to me. I swear, I think Trish from TLC Book Tours sent Royal Wedding to me at least three, maybe four times. In the end she bought me a copy of the ebook—and then, the next day, the last book she sent actually arrived.

July’s been a busy month for me, but I really wanted to do this blog tour, so when she said she still had some dates available (since my original date had long slipped past), I picked the very last date she had, figuring that would give me time to read the book.

Which, unfortunately, I failed to do. Things just got too busy, with my writing course with Kelley Armstrong, and then with the aftermath, which has added a chunk of fiction writing time to my daily routine. So yes, I am writing this blog post having read only the first few chapters of Royal Wedding.

And last of all (because, of course, these things generally come in threes): My blog tour date was yesterday. I had added the date to Google Calendar—but for some reason, I didn’t get any reminders, which probably means I forgot to set the reminders. But still, at the beginning of this past week, I knew I would be writing this blog post. For Friday, July 31.

Then Thursday (and then Friday) rolled around and I forgot. So yes, I am a day late with this post.

See what I mean?

But I am here now, and ready to tell you more about Royal Wedding. And yes, I’ve only read a few chapters, so you’re probably wondering, what on earth can Belle tell us when she’s only read the first couple of chapters? But if you’re a Princess Diaries fan, I can tell you this: it’s Mia! She’s back! She’s grown up, but at her core, she’s still the same Mia we know and love. Just a little older, with more adult things on her mind.

It’s something each of us can relate to, I think.

I can already see the conflicts that are building up for her, and I’m eager to head deeper into her story—just need to find some time to grab so I can plunge in.

So, obviously this isn’t a review, since one can hardly review a book on the strength of a few chapters read. But if you’ve read and loved the Princess Diaries series, what I can say is this: Royal Wedding gives you the chance to enter Mia’s world again, and while she’s not a young adult anymore, her voice is just as endearing and engaging as always.

Snapshot: July 26, 2015

Time: 8:20 pm

Feeling: Productive, even though I really haven’t done much today. But I FINALLY got around to getting some pictures taken so I can have a decent social media picture, instead of either the one that’s years old, or the one where I’m hiding behind my 12-year-old Dylan or the one where I’m on the edge of the picture with all three of my kids.

It turns out I was using a different picture on different social media sites. Once I uploaded to Facebook, it took me another ten minutes to log in and change my pictures on all my other social media accounts and all my email accounts, too. Phew! But I’m glad I finally got it done.

It was quite the family affair. I got Dylan to take several shots of me, and then today when I met my daughter Hayley for an early dinner, I got her to select the shot she liked best.

This was actually the picture I personally liked, but I guess it doesn’t work well as a social media profile pic, does it?

Me trying to grab the phone

Eating: I went with Hayley to Queen Mother Café here on Queen Street West. They had a smaller menu than normal when we went, but Hayley was very pleased with her Ping Gai (boneless chicken marinated with garlic, coriander and black peppercorns, grilled crispy and served with a spicy lime and coriander dipping sauce, salad and  jasmine steamed rice) and I was quite happy with my arugula and smoked cheddar cheese salad (baby arugula, toasted pumpkin seeds, pickled red onion and  grape tomatoes, in a lime spinach and Dijon dressing, topped with grated smoked cheddar cheese). I also added grilled chicken to it so it would be more substantial.

Reading: Maybe it’s a summer thing, but I seem to be drawn to chunksters right now. There’s Atlas Shrugged, which I want to read for the #AtlasRAL. And there’s my book club read, The Name of the Wind (I know! It’s so exciting—I’m in a science fiction and fantasy book club!).

What’s really gotten my attention lately, though, is Brandon Sanderson’s The Way of Kings. What a great book! I’m about a third of the way through, and I’m really liking it.

Listening: I haven’t had a chance to get back to Ernest Cline’s Armada, which makes me quite sad because I’ve really enjoyed the few chapters I’ve listened to. I find I haven’t had as much time for audiobooks because when I’m not doing something I’m trying to keep noodling over bits and pieces of the story I’m working on. I used to do this all the time—I’d go off on a daydream about whatever book I happened to be writing, any time, any place—but it’s something I’ve gotten out of the habit of doing over the past four or five years. Which has been detrimental to my writing but very good for my audiobook stats.

Writing: Yes! I am still writing! Although I’ve now written all the scenes I’ve thought up, so the past few days I’ve been brainstorming instead of actually writing any new scenes. But I’m brainstorming in a “writing journal” file specifically for this book, so I’m counting it even if the word count can’t be added to my actual writing word count. Because really, while actually writing the words of your novel every day is a good goal, there’s some prep work that needs to be done and if I didn’t count it as “writing” I’d feel pretty down on the days when I didn’t “write” even though I was still working on my story. Right?

Working: This is a bit of a heavier week coming up for me. I’ve got three deadlines to finish up, plus it’s my older son’s birthday this Thursday. The tabletop board games I ordered for his birthday did arrive in time, which is good. He wants to have biscuits and sausage gravy for his birthday dinner, so we’re trying to find a restaurant around here that has that on its menu.

Creating: Nothing yet, but I’ve got a nice big stash now of adult colouring books, and I’m just waiting for a bit of time so I can pull out my Prismacolor pencils and start colouring!

I’m writing!


I was going to write a post titled “10 things I learned from Kelley Armstrong’s Dark Fantasy class”, and I probably still will later this week, but in the meantime … I’m so excited because I’M WRITING!

I think the biggest thing I got out of Kelley’s class was motivation. When class ended on Friday, I was all fired up. I was going to WRITE. Yes, I was.

Then Saturday came and I kind of twiddled it away. I researched RPG games (I want to play them with my youngest, which means I have to learn how to play them, since I’ve never played a role-playing game before). And then I researched tabletop board games, for my oldest’s birthday at the end of the month. Which basically meant sitting there with my youngest watching Wil Wheaton play a bunch of really fun-looking games on his YouTube show Tabletop.

I really like this one. I mean really? Surviving a zombie apocalypse? Count me in!

And then I spent Saturday night listening to Wil Wheaton narrating Ernest Cline’s Armada. So yes, I guess you could say it was a Wil Wheaton kind of day. And not a writing kind of day.

But on Sunday? I did it. I decided I wasn’t going to do anything else until I actually made myself sit down and write.

And I did.

Same thing yesterday.

Today it was a little harder. I’d written myself into (yet) another corner. And you know what? I actually contemplated killing off that particular character. Make things easier for me, you know?

But I stuck with it. I sat down and ended up writing over 2,000 words. And in the process wrote myself out of that corner. I even left off partway through a second chapter, a trick several famous authors recommend (Ernest Hemingway was one, I believe).

I feel determined. I’m not getting any younger, and I have all these stories inside of me. Plus I get new ideas all the time. Kelley’s feedback has shown me, yes, I can write, and write well. So now what I need to do is get those stories down.

I need to finish my novels.

I’m going to do this.

So there you have it.


Snapshot: July 16, 2015

Time: 9:25 pm

Feeling: A little sad, because tomorrow’s the last day of my Dark Fantasy writing class. And tired, because for some reason I was wired last night and had trouble falling asleep. Before I started feeling tired, I was actually feeling motivated, so I’m hoping if I get a good night’s sleep tonight I’ll go back to being motivated again!

Reading: I haven’t had much time to read this week. I did read a few pages of Meg Cabot’s Royal Wedding, since I need to post a review at the end of the month for the book’s blog tour, but what with being tired it was hard to get into it.



My Armada audiobook preorder came in earlier this week! I haven’t had a chance to transfer it over to my iPod, and I’m not going to do it tonight because I’m just way too tired to listen to it without falling asleep. So it will have to wait until the weekend.

Writing: Nothing, but hey, I’ve been in writing classes all this week! But I’ve started daydreaming scenes, which is good. I’m hoping to start a new writing schedule (that I’ll stick to) this weekend. Taking this writing class makes me feel I will finally start finishing my novels, so I want to tap into this motivation for as long as it lasts (hopefully it will last and last and never go away …).

Working: I’ve got one big index and one small index due next week, so in addition to starting a new writing schedule this weekend, I’ll also be working. Sigh.

Looking forward to: My last day of class tomorrow!